Out of the Woods: The Story of Cornwall's Forests
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Private Camping



Campers at Mohawk Pond
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

By the 1880s, “camping out” had become a popular pastime. Places like the Adirondacks were lauded as ideal retreats for anyone seeking to improve their health by virtue of clean air and moderate exercise. The growth of the cities and industry created a desire to retreat to the forests and countryside.

 

 

 

 

 

 


Laurel Lodge, Cream Hill Lake, circa 1905
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

The national passion for camping reached Cornwall by the turn of the century. In 1901, George Chandler Harrison built the first cabin on Cream Hill Lake and named it Laurel Lodge. It was followed by John E. Calhoun’s The Nutshell and the Yutzler family’s Camp Tak-it-ezy (take it easy).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Tented dining area, Camp Tak-it-ezy, early 20th century
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

"'Camping out' is becoming merely a name for moving out of one’s permanent habitation and dwelling for a few weeks in a well-built lodge, smaller than one’s home, but as comfortable and almost as convenient; with tables, chairs and crockery, carpets and curtains, beds with sheets and blankets on real bedsteads, a stove and its full outfit of cooking utensils, wherefrom meals are served in the regular ways of civilization… This misnamed camping out has become a fashion which seems likely to last till the shores are as thronged as the towns, and the woods are spoiled for real campers…."

~ Rowland Evans Robinson, In New England
Fields and Woods
, 1896

 

 

 

 


Reading and sewing at Camp Tak-it-ezy
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

"Camping, until of late years, has been the almost exclusive enjoyment of men, women having been considered rather useless and burdensome under the circumstances… but now that women have proved that they are not so frail and helpless… camp life has taken on a new charm."

~ Jessamy Harte, “A Camp in the Adirondacks,
Ladies’ Home Journal, July 1892

 

 

 

 

 


Camp Linnet, June 30, 1899
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

This glass plate negative is believed to have been shot
at Cornwall's Cream Hill Lake. The men identified by
their names over their tent lived and worked in New Haven.

 

 

"From my experience and observation, I am thoroughly convinced that camp-life in dry places, and at a reasonable altitude above the water, especially in a pine grove, has a wonderful effect in benefitting and restoring weak lungs."

~ The Adirondacks as a Health Resort, 1886

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Nutshell cabin, built on Cream Hill Lake
by John Calhoun, early 20th century

Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Fouth of July celebration at
Camp Tak-it-ezy, early 20th century

Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Diners at Camp Tak-it-ezy, early 20th century
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Camp Tak-it-ezy, early 20th century
Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Jessie Cochrane and Miner Rogers cooking
breakfast at Camp Tak-it-Ezy, 1910

Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Benedict family and friends at their
camp dining table, early 20th century

Collection of Cornwall Historical Society

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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